One of the best face washes for sensitive skin, this soap-free, fragrance-free, non-comedogenic cleanser works to remove excess oil from your skin without irritation. It’s great for oily and combination skin types, as it cleans and purifies without making the skin taut and dry. Its formula is glycerin-based for a gentle cleanser that won’t provoke even the most sensitive of skin types.
Acne is not curable, but it is controllable. Proper acne treatment can prevent and/or improve acne scars and help you to feel and look your best. Seeing a dermatologist like Dr. Turner helps ensure that you are getting the best acne treatment available, since she makes outstanding patient care a priority. This means she listens to patients’ concerns and chooses appropriate therapies for each individual. A consultation with Dr. Turner will be comfortable, informative and respectful. To schedule a visit to discuss therapeutic options, you can book an appointment online or call the office to make an appointment at (214) 373-7546.
It’s safe to say there are more types of treatment for acne than there are types of acne. From OTC medicines to home remedies to dermatologist-prescribed products, there are many ways to combat acne breakouts. We’ve talked primarily about over-the-counter products, but here are just a few other treatment options (as well as a look at acne’s causes – and myths).
Infused with salicylic acid from white willow bark and antioxidant-rich chamomile and gotu kola, this clarifying face wash is formulated for men and women of all skin types. It exfoliates and unclogs pores to boost cell turnover, soothes inflamed skin and counters free radical damage. Also works as a makeup remover and a deep-cleansing shaving cream!
For some, the right dosage can be found over-the-counter in concentrations as low as 2.5 percent or up to 10 percent, but for others, a prescription dosage is needed to see the best results. Prescription doses rarely go over 10 percent, as benzoyl peroxide is known to cause stinging, burning, itching, flaking, peeling, and redness2 when used in concentrations over 5 percent, but they may combine the benzoyl peroxide with other acne medications.
Tiege Hanley employs a chemist – known only as “The Chemist” – who formulates all of its products. According to TH, The Chemist is a firm believer that diet and excessive face-washing don’t clear up acne  but that a topical treatment makes all the difference. Tiege Hanley’s acne cream is infused with salicylic acid, which helps shed the top layer of skin cells

Protect your skin. Skin care doesn't end when you leave your bathroom. Wear a noncomedogenic (non-pore clogging) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or more that offers both UVA and UVB protection to shield your sensitive skin against the sun's harsh rays. A water- or light liquid-based sunscreen is best for acne-prone skin. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. While outside, wear a hat with at least a 2-inch brim and clothing to cover exposed skin.
In 2015, acne was estimated to affect 633 million people globally, making it the 8th most common disease worldwide.[9][17] Acne commonly occurs in adolescence and affects an estimated 80–90% of teenagers in the Western world.[18][19][20] Lower rates are reported in some rural societies.[20][21] Children and adults may also be affected before and after puberty.[22] Although acne becomes less common in adulthood, it persists in nearly half of affected people into their twenties and thirties and a smaller group continue to have difficulties into their forties.[2]
In terms of their effectiveness, both these ingredients are beneficial. Any related product worth its salt will have either one of these in their formula. In fact, some products incorporate both. However, in saying this, our research has provided conclusive proof that salicylic acid is the one to choose. Below are the main points as to why we think this is the case:

Antibiotics for acne, both topical and oral, used to be the top prescriptions for getting clear skin, but research has revealed that they aren’t the best option for most people today due to something called antibacterial resistance. This is where bacteria mutate, become immune to certain antibiotics, then reproduce offspring that are also immune, creating entire colonies of bacteria that can’t be killed by certain antibiotics.
Pharaohs are recorded as having had acne, which may be the earliest known reference to the disease. Since at least the reign of Cleopatra (69–30 BC), the application of sulfur to the skin has been recognized as a useful treatment for acne.[162] The sixth-century Greek physician Aëtius of Amida is credited with coining the term "ionthos" (ίονθωξ,) or "acnae", which is believed to have been a reference to facial skin lesions that occur during "the 'acme' of life" (puberty).[163]

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The severity of acne vulgaris (Gr. ἀκµή, "point" + L. vulgaris, "common")[23] can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe as this helps to determine an appropriate treatment regimen.[19] Mild acne is classically defined by the presence of clogged skin follicles (known as comedones) limited to the face with occasional inflammatory lesions.[19] Moderate severity acne is said to occur when a higher number of inflammatory papules and pustules occur on the face compared to mild cases of acne and are found on the trunk of the body.[19] Severe acne is said to occur when nodules (the painful 'bumps' lying under the skin) are the characteristic facial lesions and involvement of the trunk is extensive.[19][24]
The severity of acne vulgaris (Gr. ἀκµή, "point" + L. vulgaris, "common")[23] can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe as this helps to determine an appropriate treatment regimen.[19] Mild acne is classically defined by the presence of clogged skin follicles (known as comedones) limited to the face with occasional inflammatory lesions.[19] Moderate severity acne is said to occur when a higher number of inflammatory papules and pustules occur on the face compared to mild cases of acne and are found on the trunk of the body.[19] Severe acne is said to occur when nodules (the painful 'bumps' lying under the skin) are the characteristic facial lesions and involvement of the trunk is extensive.[19][24]
How to Handle It: Consider salicylic acid your secret weapon. "This beta hydroxy acid helps remove excess oil and exfoliate dead cells from the skin's surface to keep pores clear," says Zeichner. Try Clinique's Acne Solution Clearing Gel, a two-time Best of Beauty winner that packs both salicylic acid and sea whip extract — an ingredient with skin-soothing properties — to help counteract the dryness sometimes caused by salicylic acid. The formula does double duty: It works as a spot treatment for mild to moderate acne and as a nightly allover treatment for pimple prevention. And since it dries clear, you can wear it to fight zits whenever, wherever.

Perioral dermatitis Granulomatous perioral dermatitis Phymatous rosacea Rhinophyma Blepharophyma Gnathophyma Metophyma Otophyma Papulopustular rosacea Lupoid rosacea Erythrotelangiectatic rosacea Glandular rosacea Gram-negative rosacea Steroid rosacea Ocular rosacea Persistent edema of rosacea Rosacea conglobata variants Periorificial dermatitis Pyoderma faciale
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